Ceramic Mosaics Mend Cracked Sidewalks, Potholes, and Buildings in Vibrant Interventions by Ememem

Throughout his home city of Lyon, Ememem is known as “the pavement surgeon.” The artist repairs gouged sidewalks and splintered facades with colorful mosaics that he describes as “a poem that everybody can read.” Intricate geometric motifs laid with pristine tiles hug the cracks and create “a memory notebook of the city. It reveals what happened, the life in these public places,” he tells Colossal. “Here cobblestones have been picked up and thrown. There a truck from the vegetable market tore off a piece of asphalt…”
Ememem’s first mosaic dates back 10 years when he found himself in a damaged alley in Lyon. More Continue reading

Watch
Delightful Characters Spring to Life in Hand-Cranked Wooden Automata by Kazuaki Harada
May 12, 2021

Japanese woodworker Kazuaki Harada (previously) has spent the last few years designing these playful automata that activate with a simple hand-crank. Watch miners work in tandem, a figure cackle with unparalleled enthusiasm, and the devil aggressively play the fiddle, and make sure to turn your volume up, too—Harada often pairs an audio component with the mechanical movements for an additional dose of whimsy. For more of his quirky designs, which include many of the character-based works shown here in addition to more elaborate, abstract pieces, check out his Instagram and YouTube. More Continue reading

Watch
The Best Clamp Lights for Illuminating Your Workspace
May 11, 2021

Clamp lights are a good addition to any artist’s or photographer’s studio or hobbyist’s workshop. Compact and portable, these lighting fixtures feature a gripping device so you can attach them to tables, beams, and other surfaces. Since they can be directed like spotlights, these lamps are great options for artists who need to illuminate specific […] Continue reading

Watch
Illusory Photographs of Mountain Landscapes Are Flipped 90 Degrees to Reveal Human-Like Profiles

There’s a long history of connecting natural occurrences and pareidolia, or the inclination to see an object or find meaning where it physically doesn’t exist. The psychological phenomenon is responsible for a range of human experiences from the childhood pastime of cloud watching to the Rorschach test to the idea that there’s a man in the moon and one that’s aided in naming some of the rocky formations photographed by Bernhard Lang (previously). More Continue reading

Watch
Duplicate Figures Freeze in Motion as a Dancer Writhes and Contorts Her Body in an Entrancing Short Film


Weakness of the Flesh” is a captivating and eerie short film that appears to clone dancer Emma Rosenzweig-Bock, who twists and contorts her body amongst a sea of her own figure. Shot in Los Angeles, the disquieting piece contrasts Rosenzweig-Bock’s graceful sequences with more compulsive, Suspiria-esque jolts as she writhes and pulls her dirt-covered body from the concrete. As she dances, her doubles glitch and freeze in position, sometimes predicting her next move or remaining still in a previous bend. More Continue reading

Watch
Piece Together the Geography of the Earth and Moon in Infinite Combinations with Nervous System’s Jigsaw Puzzles

Longtime Colossal readers are likely familiar with Nervous System’s unmistakable jigsaws, two of which we just added to the Colossal Shop. Both Earth and Moon designs are infinity puzzles, meaning you can start exploring their expansive geographies from any spot—there’s no fixed shape, and they can be completed in thousands of arrangements. Each jigsaw also comes with whimsy pieces and is made from laser-cut birch plywood in the team’s studio in the Catskills. More Continue reading

Watch
This Folded Paper Book Opens Up to Reveal 31 Layered Storage Compartments


Tuck away your coins and small mementos for safekeeping in this nested storage book. Comprised of 31 compartments, the design features layers of folds, meaning that the 16 flowers on top and the pockets supporting them open up to reveal small compartments that vary in size. Originally, the paper books, which are called zhen xian bao, were used to hold thread and other embroidery materials—this article dives into the history behind the traditional Chinese practice—and would unroll in multiples from a single binding. More Continue reading

Watch
Discarded Technology and Branded Trash Are Stacked into Dystopian Structures in Alvaro Naddeo’s Paintings

Behind each one of Alvaro Naddeo’s watercolor paintings is an imagined character who’s built a rickety shopping cart structure or gathered waste materials for a tiny, mobile dwelling. “I believe they are strong people, resilient, and survivalists,” the Brazilian artist tells Colossal. “They use creativity to overcome obstacles and adapt to any situation they are put in. So in a way, both of them, characters and discarded objects, are proof that there’s value in everything if you know where to look for it.”
Evoking an alternative universe in a state of ruin, Naddeo (previously) renders ramshackle structures and vehicles—which only span a few inches—made primarily of outdated technology, rusted carts and frames, and a plethora of branded materials: a Marlboro sign props up an upper level, a Coca-Cola panel offers protection from the elements, and logoed posters and stickers cover almost every surface. More Continue reading

Watch