Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia
February 20, 2020

In 1832, artist John Jesse Barker added depth to a drawing by Philadelphia-based William G. Mason to create an optical illusion titled “Horizontorium.” Part of a tradition of anamorphic works, this depiction of the Bank of Philadelphia is one of the two surviving works looking at the historic financial building designed by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. At the time, it was the unofficial bank of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that sat at the southwest corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets. More Continue reading

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A Minimalist Home in Japan Utilizes a Tent Structure With Open Air Sides
February 12, 2020

A new tent-shaped home built in a small agricultural village near Nagoka, a city in the Niigata prefecture of Japan, is designed with a community in mind, rather than a single family. Conceived of by Takeru Shoji Architects, the 166.24 square-meter “Hara House” is situated on a larger estate and utilizes a simple A-frame structure made up of 120 millimeter-wide beams. The two-story home has a kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, and living space downstairs, with storage and two small rooms upstairs. More Continue reading

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Framing Pattern and Symmetry, Unintended Beauty Explores Intricacies of Industrial Spaces
February 7, 2020

It’s well understood that producing a single book is an arduous task, making it even more impressive that British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper is offering three distinct versions of his newly released work, Unintended Beauty. The monograph is available in three covers⁠—an orange or blue option with architectural and machine focuses and a black one with hanging sausages⁠—created by the design firm, IRONFLAG.
The Copenhagen-based artist has an eye for spotting the sublime complexities inside warehouses, factories, and shipyards of global institutions like Adidas, Boeing, The European Space Agency, and the Swiss research laboratory CERN, where he captured the pattern and symmetry of the industrial spaces. More Continue reading

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Seagulls and Pigeons Photobomb Shots of Rome by Photographer Skander Khlif 
February 2, 2020

Munich-based photographer Skander Khlif documents public spaces with the Shakespearian mentality that life is theater and we are all actors. The play becomes both comedy and drama in his recent From Rome, With Birds… series. Seagulls and pigeons take center stage as they fly between the camera and scenes of Italian street life.
Either well-timed shots or a curated collection of happy accidents, Khlif’s humorous series presents an alternate view of a city typically visited and photographed for its architecture. More Continue reading

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A Floating Hotel with Aurora Views Just Opened on a Frozen River in Sweden
January 26, 2020

After 16 months of construction, a spa hotel built on the Lule River in the northern province of Lapland Sweden is now open to travelers. Called Arctic Bath, the 12-room hotel features six elevated land cabins and six cabins that float when the river thaws. In the center is a circular structure with saunas, hot baths around the perimeter, and a large ice bath at its core.
For the buoyant rooms and main structure, architects Bertil Harström and Johan Kauppi took design inspiration from timber floating methods used by loggers to transport felled trees downriver. More Continue reading

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Nature Reclaims Abandoned Castles, Theaters, and Monasteries in Photographs by Jonk
January 25, 2020

Inspired by a wildlife documentary he saw as a child, Paris-based photographer Jonk (Jonathan Jimenez) travels the world in search of man-made structures that have been abandoned and reclaimed by nature. A jungle fills a dilapidated theater in Cuba, roots snake through a mansion in Taiwan, and a wild garden sprouts in a former greenhouse in Belgium. A reflection of his ecological consciousness, Jonk’s photography shows that in the power struggle between man and nature, nature always wins. More Continue reading

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Dlectricity, Detroit’s Light and Art Festival, is Now Accepting Artist Applications
January 20, 2020

For three electrifying weekends in 2012, 2014, and 2017, Dlectricity brought thousands of people into Midtown Detroit to experience 40 luminous projects by local, national, and international artists. This ambitious nighttime festival is back again with an expanded footprint, September 25-26, 2020, to transform Detroit with site-specific installations of light, video, performance, sound, interactive engineering, and nonconformist architecture. From lasers and 3D mapping to dance performances and large-scale video projections, we want to see what you create. More Continue reading

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Giant Seesaws Transform New York City’s Garment District into Light-Filled Urban Playground

New York City’s Garment District recently received a dose of cold-weather fun with Impluse, an interactive installation of 12 oversize seesaws that glow and emit sound when someone hops on one end. Originally shown at the Place Des Festivals in Montreal in 2016 before traveling to cities like Chicago, Boston, Scottsdale, the installation allows users to produce their own light and sound shows that transform the city’s dreary January streets. More Continue reading

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Post Victorian Art Nouveau Prints
March 7, 2015

Art Nouveau Prints Follow Victoria While the Victorian era may have been named after Great Britain’s Queen Victoria, the Art Nouveau period had no such monarch as its moniker’s standard bearer. The video on this page explores some wonderful Art … Continue reading

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