“Dormant Seasons” by Photographer Erinn Springer
January 22, 2021

Photographer Erinn Springer explores her midwestern roots in her recent series, “Dormant Seasons.” Originally from Wisconsin, Springer went to school in New York City and is currently based between both places. Initially started as a way to interact with her family and greater Wisconsin community, the series has blossomed into a reflective exploration of self, … Continued Continue reading

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Loose Fibers Billow Out of Warped Ceramic Sculptures by Artist Nicole McLaughlin
January 14, 2021

“As a product of an American father and a Mexican mother, I am influenced by the conflicting expectations I have received as a woman within my two cultures,” says artist Nicole McLaughlin. From her studio in Marion, Massachusetts, McLaughlin combines historically domestic crafts—ceramics and fiber art—into striking sculptures that explore identity and heritage, particularly in relation to gendered expectations, traditions, and the changes that occur as generations pass.
In her mixed-media works, the artist contrasts the soft, pliable fibers with the fragility of the plates painted with blue-and-white motifs. More Continue reading

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Countless Ceramic Loops Comprise Cecil Kempernick’s Movable Chain Sculptures
December 30, 2020

Spread flat or folded in shapeless piles, Cecil Kempernick’s bulky chain sculptures contrast the solid ceramic material with the flexibility of their shapes. The movable works are comprised of hundreds of loops that link together in sheets of earth tones and subtle gradients. Whether heaped on the floor or draped across Kempernick’s body, the hefty chain mail is at once supple and fragile.
The artist (previously), who is based on the island of Texel in the Netherlands, draws her understanding of motion from the surrounding water and environment. More Continue reading

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Clusters of Candy-Colored Domes Designed for Communal Living Populate Iran’s Hormuz Island
December 8, 2020

Along the beaches of Hormuz Island in the Persian Gulf lies a series of gumdrop-esque abodes. The multipurpose project, titled “Presence in Hormuz,” features earthen structures that dot the sandy landscape in a textured cluster of peaks and bulbs.
To build the candy-colored domes, ZAV Architects utilized the SuperAdobe process of renowned Iranian architect Nader Khalili, which involves stacking coils of wet earth, and trained local craftsman in the technique. More Continue reading

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Subversively Elegant Portraits of Indigenous People Drawn on Repurposed Ledgers by Artist Chris Pappan
November 25, 2020

In his mixed-media portraits, Chicago-based artist Chris Pappan draws on the tradition of ledger art, a practice that flourished among Native populations throughout the Great Plains from around 1850 to 1920. Rooted in narratives, the renderings depicted the ways of life of Indigenous people and the nuances otherwise left out of mainstream conversations. “The mid-19th Century was a tumultuous time for the Indigenous peoples of America; the doctrine of Manifest Destiny brought deep pain and suffering but it also introduced new modes of expression,” says Pappan, who is a citizen of the Kaw (Kanza) Nation and of Osage, Lakota and mixed European heritage. More Continue reading

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A Towering Metallic Monolith Was Just Discovered in a Remote Area of Utah
November 24, 2020

The Utah Department of Public Safety has put itself to the fullest possible use by not only counting bighorn sheep roaming the region but also discovering an unusual fixture jutting out from the rocky landscape. Last week, state employees stumbled upon a nearly 12-foot-tall silver monolith while flying overhead. Mimicking the inexplicable structure in the opening scene of Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, the lustrous object appears to be made of metal and is located in an undisclosed area. More Continue reading

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Artist Nari Ward Has Spent Decades Revitalizing Found Objects to Elucidate Counter Narratives
November 13, 2020

Jamaica-born artist Nari Ward bases his practice in found objects and their inherent mutability. The Harlem-based artist has scoured New York City’s streets for 25 years gathering house keys escaped from a ring, discarded glass bottles, and clothing tossed season-to-season. Through sculptures and large-scale installations, the scavenged objects find new meaning, whether explicitly scribing a phrase from the United States Constitution or creating more subtle historical connections.
While commenting broadly on themes of race, poverty, and rampant consumerism, Ward is cognizant of the varied meanings burned wooden bats or shoelaces hold for different populations. More Continue reading

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Stunning Photographs Capture the International Space Station Traveling Across the Sun and Moon
November 6, 2020

Back in October, Sacramento-based photographer Andrew McCarthy staked out in his backyard to document the International Space Station on one of its trips across the sun. Using two scopes, he successfully captured the image, which frames the station in the upper left corner of the fiery mass.
Two weeks later, he repeated that process: “Yesterday morning after spending hours scouting for the right location, I set up my gear on the side of a road hoping to capture something I’ve never seen before. More Continue reading

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Circular Paintings Expose the Fleshy Innards of Halved Oranges, Pomegranates, and Other Fruits
October 16, 2020

Using round canvases with a range of diameters, Alonsa Guevara deftly paints the plump, juicy insides of oranges, watermelon, and other fruits. Each circular piece depicts a seemingly perfect slice down the middle, capturing the fibrous veins and central seeds found within fresh produce.
Guevara spent her childhood in the Ecuadorian rainforests surrounded by tropical landscapes and nearby agriculture, an experience of nature that influences her artistic practice. The Chilean artist, who lives in New York City, began fruit portraits in 2014 as she reflected on her adolescence and thought of creating a body of work that felt universal. More Continue reading

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An Intimate Short Film Highlights 2020’s Crises through Exquisitely Surreal Scenes
September 22, 2020


Set to subdued music, Nicolas Lichtle’s short film titled “à la fin…” is an unusually ethereal depiction of the crises climaxing in 2020. The delicate animation flows through a series of lightly-hued scenes that explore reactions to COVID-19, the wildfires raging across the planet, and the endless distractions of technology. “It’s a moment of introspection, very intimate, staged through a succession of small moments imbued with poetry, absurdity, and sometimes surrealism…” Lichtle writes. More Continue reading

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Overview Timelapse: A New Book Documents Vast Changes to the Earth’s Surface by Human Hands
August 27, 2020

In a follow-up to the 2016 book Overview featuring stunning imagery of the Earth from above, Overview Timelapse: How We Change the Earth takes a critical look at the numerous ways humans have completely altered the surface of our planet in a very short time through urban development, climate change, and deforestation. Overview founder Benjamin Grant and writer Timothy Dougherty have teamed up to examine some 250 new satellite images that capture the remarkable changes currently taking place all around us from a dramatic macro perspective. More Continue reading

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A Dozing Owl and Tussling Hummingbirds Top the 2020 Bird Photographer of the Year Competition
August 25, 2020

The winning shots from the renowned Bird Photographer of the Year contest capture the mundane moments and extraordinary adventures of our avian neighbors. From a sleepy owl camouflaged by tree bark to a lurching great crested grebe, the stunning birds shown here were chosen out of more than 15,000 entries from photographers around the globe.
The charity organization Birds on the Brink hosted the fifth-annual competition, and profits garnered go directly toward conservation efforts. More Continue reading

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An Astronaut and Photographer Collaboratively Document NASA’s Vast International Space Station in a New Book
August 13, 2020

In what is believed to be the first collaboration between an Earth-bound artist and an astronaut in space, photographer Roland Miller and engineer Paolo Nespoli have recorded the momentous journey of NASA’s International Space Station (ISS). The two have been working together during the last few years to document the current technologies and sights of modern space travel. They’ve shot extraordinary photographs of an ocean blanketed with clouds, the wire labyrinths lining the vehicle, and astronaut’s bulging suits and helmets.   More Continue reading

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“Healing” by Artist Evan M. Cohen
August 4, 2020

Another lovely comic from New York-based artist and illustrator Evan M. Cohen (previously featured here).   I can see the forest In the distance, I can hear my name From above, I am alive, I am magnetic, The Earth pulls at my love. She wakes me With her electric skies, She shows me How to … Continued Continue reading

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Richard Clarkson Studio’s New Aurora Collection Captures the Elegance of the Southern Lights
July 29, 2020

Aurora is a story of a celestial voyage: inspired by NASA satellite footage, Richard Clarkson Studio sought to create a collection that captures the feeling of flying through space and witnessing the Aurora Australis as it dances above the earth. Drawing from a palette of delicate greens, fuchsia, and blues, the design mimics the elegant melange of colors emitted during the phenomenon through translucent lights, opaque blacks, and clouded resin panels. Comprised of a chandelier, linear suspension, pendants, sconces, and desk stand, the new Aurora Collection is Richard Clarkson’s most ambitious lighting endeavor yet, allowing for use in a multitude of settings that range from residences to museums and large-scale event installations. More Continue reading

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