Unused Microchips, Motherboards, and Other Electronic Waste Make This Upcycled Watch Tick
August 7, 2020

Recent reports estimate that the world produced 53.6 million metric tons of electronic waste last year alone, a record high that’s expected only to rise. In an effort to prevent digging up precious materials like gold, silver, and aluminum just to return them to the ground later on as trash, the sustainable fashion brand Vollebak has introduced Garbage Watch.
As its name suggests, the upcycled timepiece is constructed with old motherboards, microchips, and computer parts, utilizing bright electrical cords as the strap with an open face and exposed mechanisms.  More Continue reading

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Tote Around Exactly One Watermelon in This Elegant, Leather Bag
August 1, 2020

Say goodbye to the days of fumbling an unwieldy melon while trying to carry in groceries. Japanese designer Tsuchiya Kaban’s latest leather bag provides an elegant, luxury vessel tote around your fruit. Holding exactly one, round watermelon, the carrier was crafted by Yusuke Kadoi as part of a project titled The Fun of Carrying, which encouraged designers to create playful, inventive items as side projects. Watch the video below to see Kadoi’s process and how simply he secures a watermelon inside. More Continue reading

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The Best Paper Dolls for Imaginative Crafting and Play
July 29, 2020

Who’s up on the latest fashion trends, cuts the best figure, and puts together the best looks? A paper doll. A generations-old toy, dress-up paper dolls owe their origins to 18th century France, where they had movable limbs and were akin to puppets. A London company produced the first commercially available paper doll in 1810, […] Continue reading

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Waste Electrical Wires Are Woven into Delicate, Lace Garments by Designer Alexandra Sipa
July 14, 2020

United Kingdom-based designer Alexandra Sipa creates spellbinding accessories and garments from waste electrical wires. The Central Saint Martins’ graduate initially was inspired to experiment with wires as textiles when her headphones broke, leading her to extract the colorful coils and cables to create wire lace. 
The designer learned to craft vibrant lace from YouTube videos, books, and her own mishaps, and one of her enchanting dresses took 1,000 hours to complete. Many cultural and historical references are woven into her pieces, including her interest in extreme austerity and heightened femininity in Romania. More Continue reading

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Sprawling Metal Forms Elegant, Sculptural Jewelry by Designer Laura Estrada
July 7, 2020

Los Angeles-based designer Laura Estrada handcrafts sustainable jewelry pieces that are conceptually driven, sculptural adornments for the body and face. She uses ancient metalsmithing techniques to create timeless, wearable heirlooms that merge fashion with art. “From a very young age, I have been building little objects with my hands, ” Estrada explains. “This obsession manifested itself when I took a metalsmithing class in college.”
Metal is the designer’s chosen medium, and she describes it as a fierce, unforgiving, stubborn, resilient, and enduring material. More Continue reading

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Brighten Your Notebook Pages with the Best Colored Pen Sets
May 1, 2020

What’s blue and black and red all over? Pens! But they don’t have to be. No need to limit yourself to stock ballpoint pen or Sharpie colors—liven up your planners, architectural drawings, illustrations, journals, and calendars with splashy color, thanks to colored fine-tipped pens! Artists, illustrators, educators, fashion designers, architects, and doodlers alike can choose […] Continue reading

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Fringed Orange Apparel Knit Entirely From Rubber Bands by Rie Sakamoto
April 25, 2020

At first, the garments look as though they’ve been spun with a traditional medium—wool or yarn—but on closer inspection, it becomes apparent that the thin and springy mesh-like material is composed of thousands of elastic bands that have been knitted together. Made by Japanese designer Rie Sakamoto, the handmade collection is composed of a jacket and dress, each of which illustrates the diverse functionality of stationery items like rubber bands. 
Sakamoto’s “rubber collection” initially was exhibited at Tama Art University in Toyko as part of a graduate exhibition and the garments, which took Sakamoto half a year to make, reflect on how overlooked materials and objects can have diverse uses in fashion, contemporary design, and art.  More Continue reading

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Artist-Designed Face Masks by Threadless Give Medical Supplies to Communities in Need
April 22, 2020

A recent launch by Threadless is an impressive, multifaceted initiative to combat COVID-19 that’s a win for consumers trying to stay safe, health-care workers on the front lines, and artists and creatives who’ve lost income. The Chicago-based eCommerce company announced this week that it would release artist-designed face masks, with a portion of proceeds going to MedShare, a nonprofit that delivers medical supplies to communities in need. Featuring work from Rob Sheridan, Alex Norris, and Mukta Lata Barua, the cloth face makes comply with CDC guidelines but are not medical grade. More Continue reading

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Two Curious Gerbils Visit (and Chew on) a Miniature Art Museum Made by Their Quarantined Owners
April 7, 2020

Stay-home orders around the world have inspired people to fill their time creatively—think the recreations of well-known artworks and “Coronavirus Tourism Bureau” posters we mentioned last week. But rather than fashion a mock art exhibition for themselves, this London couple thought a little bit smaller. Filippo and Marianna created The Gerbil Museum, a miniature gallery space for their two 9-month-old gerbils, Pandoro and Tiramisù.
Complete with cardboard benches and scribbled museum labels, the wood-floored gallery houses humorous versions of iconic works. More Continue reading

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Wearable Sculptures Blend Humans into Surrounding Landscapes in Photographs by Nordic Artists
March 9, 2020

Norwegian-Finnish artist duo Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen bring a folklore-inspired vision to the relationship between humans and nature. The majority of their subjects are elders who often have a deeper connection to the lands they inhabit, work on, or cultivate.
In 2011, the pair started an imaginative series called Eyes as Big as Plates as a contemporary exploration of characters from Nordic folklore. Their photographic odyssey across 15 countries and creation of more than 100 portraits evolved into a general exploration of modern humans’ relationships to nature. More Continue reading

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