Historic Lithograph Reveals Anamorphic Views of Razed Bank of Philadelphia

In 1832, artist John Jesse Barker added depth to a drawing by Philadelphia-based William G. Mason to create an optical illusion titled “Horizontorium.” Part of a tradition of anamorphic works, this depiction of the Bank of Philadelphia is one of the two surviving works looking at the historic financial building designed by architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe. At the time, it was the unofficial bank of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania that sat at the southwest corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets. More Continue reading

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“Les Sources” by Nicolas & Jean Jullien
February 19, 2020

See more images below or on display from February 20 until March 28. For some time now, we’ve known how much the Jullien brothers have in common: a quirky passion for science-fiction, haemoglobin and aliens… a shared universe that allows them to create in unison a multifaceted range of pro- jects. From their early collaborations … Continued Continue reading

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LEGO Releases 864-Piece International Space Station Set That’s Out of This World
February 1, 2020

On February 1, LEGO launched a new Expert Creator that’s on a mission to explore outer space. Comprised of 864 pieces, the International Space Station set is equipped with a robotic arm for satellite deployment, a miniature dock, and two astronauts ready to traverse the built-in spacewalk. It also has eight movable solar panels, three cargo spacecrafts, and booklet detailing the history of the design. Fully built, the realistic model stands more than 7 inches high, 12 inches long, and 19 inches wide. More Continue reading

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Memory and Self-Love Highlight Profound Portraits of Black Figures by Harmonia Rosales
January 27, 2020

Chicago-born artist Harmonia Rosales says her striking portraits speak to “the part of me that has been the least represented in our society.” Rosales tells Colossal that much of her work⁠—⁠she largely features a central black figure surrounded by floral and animalistic details—is linked to her Afro-Cuban background. “I empower women of color through art that challenges ideological hegemony in contemporary society,” she writes. “The black female bodies of my paintings are the memory of my ancestors expressed in a way to heal and promote self-love.”
In “Harvest,” a seated woman holds three children, while two others gather at her bare feet. More Continue reading

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Paris Musées Releases 100,000 Images of Artworks for Unrestricted Public Use
January 10, 2020

This week the Paris Musées added 100,000 digital copies of its artworks to the public domain, making them free and unrestricted for the public to download and use. From Claude Monet’s “Setting Sun on the Seine at Lavacourt” to Paul Cézanne’s “Portrait of Ambroise Vollard,” the collection contains work from artists, such as Gustave Courbet, Victor Hugo, and Rembrandt, that are housed at 14 museums in Paris like the Musée d’Art Moderne, Petit Palais, and even the catacombs. More Continue reading

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22 Artists Consider the Connection Between Self-Portraits and Identity in ME
January 6, 2020

ME: An Exhibition of Contemporary Self-Portraiture” asks 22 contemporary artists to explore who they are and how they present themselves. Curated by Sugarlift and Juxtapoz contributing editor and Colossal contributor Sasha Bogojev, the exhibition presents each artists’ understanding of themselves and of the history of self-portraiture. Cesar Piette’s abstract blue face resembles dripping paint partially masked by glasses, while Prudence Flint portrays a woman napping on a pink bed next to a guitar. More Continue reading

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Gals and Dolls
March 7, 2015

Girls and Dolls #LiberateDolls Girls love dolls. That’s just a fact. OK, not all girls love dolls. But the preponderance of the evidence suggests that the ties that bond young females and inanimate dolls, is undeniable. This photo, dating back … Continue reading

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