City Lights Cast an Aura of Anonymous Mystique Over Keita Morimoto’s Streetscapes
November 17, 2022

In Keita Morimoto’s paintings, soft yellow streetlights, LED shop signs, and clinical beams of a public transit stop expose the discomfiting nature of perpetual surveillance. Working in acrylic and oil, the Japanese artist explores the scenes of daily commutes, walks with friends, and trips to a vending machine. He shrouds his streets with shadows that add a mysterious aura to the works, a feeling bolstered by the anonymity of the places and people. More

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Trees Are Tied Up in Uncanny Knots in Monsieur Plant’s Playful Sculptures
October 19, 2022

Trees have an incredible ability to adjust to their surroundings, slowly sending roots across walkways, growing through fences, or merging with other trunks. Artist Christophe Guinet, who works as Monsieur Plant, draws inspiration from nature’s ability to flex and modify in a series of uncanny, elegant sculptures titled Twist.
Since childhood, outdoor walks fueled Guinet’s creative imagination. “It was during my walks in the forest that I was inspired for this project,” he tells Colossal. More Continue reading

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Solitude and Nature’s Ephemerality Emanates from the Illuminated Forms in Sung Hwa Kim’s Paintings
September 2, 2022

A sense of solitude and the finitude of time pervade the quiet, introspective works by Sung Hwa Kim. Rendering overgrown landscapes shrouded by night, the Korean artist wields the connection between ephemerality and memory, sometimes invoking nostalgia, as well. His acrylic paintings focus on fleeting acts like a glowing lightning bug or butterfly hovering above the grass while utilizing light to “symbolize the spirit of things we once loved, have lost, despair and longing. More Continue reading

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Oil Paintings by Paco Pomet Brighten Vintage Scenes with Satirical Elements in Color
February 10, 2022

Succeeding his series of paintings titled Beginnings, Paco Pomet’s Endings applies a similarly satirical veil to his provocative and outlandish scenarios: a cleaved camper reveals red steak marbled with fat, businessmen shake hands through an elongated finger trap, and a woman walks a hand-standing friend on a leash. The Spanish artist (previously) is known for his keen sense of wit and humor and distinct visual commentary on contemporary issues like capitalism, the degradation of the environment, and moments in American history that have global impacts. More Continue reading

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Wild Animals Occupy Suburban Nights in Nicholas Moegly’s Mysterious Illustrations
November 4, 2021

In Nicholas Moegly’s shadow-laden illustrations, wild animals descend on backyards and unoccupied streets illuminated by artificial lights. The Cincinnati-based artist largely focuses on the quiet, mundane landscapes of Midwestern suburbia, although each of his works features surreal details that shroud the scenes in mystery: a lamp with no apparent electricity source lies haphazardly on the sidewalk, an empty car veers off a driveway with headlights still shining, and deer nibble on grass strangely close to a small tent. More Continue reading

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Hundreds of Hand-Sculpted Flowers and Leaves Envelop Porcelain Vessels by Artist Hitomi Hosono
November 2, 2021

Japanese artist Hitomi Hosono (previously) translates the billowing leaves of an underwater plant or the clusters of Hawthorn tree flowers into intricate sculptural assemblages devoid of their natural colors. The monochromatic bowls and vases appear to sprout incredibly detailed botanicals that Hosono layers in tight wraps and dense bunches, and while stylized in presentation, each form is derived from hours of research and observation of real specimens.
Currently living in London, Hosono draws on memories of her home in Gifa Prefecture to inform much of her work, and she allows the medium itself to dictate her practice. More Continue reading

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Booooooom BINGO #3 Sponsored by .ART
September 24, 2021

We’ve had a lot of people asking us when our next Bingo game was going to start, so without further ado, Booooooom Bingo is BACK! We’re extremely excited to announce the third edition of Booooooom Bingo with a new sponsor and a whole bunch of new prizes from some talented artists and photographers! We’re thrilled … Continued Continue reading

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Meticulous Digital Works Layer Petals, Leaves, and Natural Textures into Fantastic Creatures
March 9, 2021

Melbourne-based artist Josh Dykgraaf has a discerning eye for matching two seemingly disparate elements. In his ongoing Terraforms series, autumn leaves become feathers, magnolia petals wind into scales, and plumes form fins that swish through water. Each illustration merges flora and fauna into an entirely new fantastical creature, and a single piece can take days to complete, with the pair of Tawny Frogmouths, for example, clocking in at 55 hours and more than 3,000 layers. More Continue reading

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Around the Block: David Zinn’s Quirky Chalk Cartoons Spring to Life in a New Short Film
January 15, 2021


If you’ve walked the streets of Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the last few decades, you’ve probably spotted the wide-eyed monsters and mischievous dragons of David Zinn (previously). Since 1987, the artist has been drawing chalk-and-charcoal creatures in site-specific works that wash away with the rain. Drain pipes become robotic dogs, a pillar morphs into a giant pencil, and a green monster pops out of a brick walkway.
A new short film directed by Jonnie Lewis dives into Zinn’s practice by animating his signature cartoon cast that greets the artist as he walks around the city. More Continue reading

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Meticulously Sculpted and Tarnished Dandelions Preserve the Herb’s Ephemeral Nature in Metal
January 6, 2021

Staining friend’s hands with dandelion heads and blowing their wispy seeds are a common childhood pastime and a simple joy that Shota Suzuki channels in his delicately constructed sculptures. The Kyoto-based artist painstakingly carves copper, brass, and silver into barbed leaves and feathery seeds to recreate the ubiquitous herbs in each state of bloom and decay.
To tarnish the textured metals and alter their colors, Suzuki uses combinations of vinegar, copper sulfate, and acetic acid to create purples and blues. More Continue reading

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Recycled Scraps and Discarded Objects Are Fashioned Into an Eccentric Menagerie of Metal Animals
October 27, 2020

London-based artist Barbara Franc (previously) upcycles materials that otherwise would be tossed into the recycling bin to create a quirky menagerie of metal creatures. Composed with scraps and copper wire, the lively sculptures generally are indicative of movement: owls lift a talon mid-waddle, two cats peer over their shoulders with surprised expressions, and a squirrel appears ready to scurry off.
The diversity of Franc’s creatures mimic the breadth of materials utilized. More Continue reading

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A Massive Flower Splays Across Six Surfaces in a New Mural by Artist Mona Caron
August 3, 2020

An enormous flower overtakes the San José’s cultural affairs building in a multi-plane mural by artist Mona Caron (previously). Titled “Limonium,” the delicate, pink-and-green leaves spread out across the structure’s facade, transcending a single side. Wrapped around six walls and across four planes, the flower appears to be growing continuously from multiple angles.
The San Francisco-based artist says determining the spatial logistics was straightforward. She added reference points to the wall and superimposed her botanical piece to a photo, which guided her through the process. More Continue reading

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A Nondescript Character Sheds Suits of Fur, Bubbling Liquids, and Gnarly Wood in Hyonotic CGI Animation
July 27, 2020


From gurgling liquids to crackling fire to rainbow-colored fur, a range of materials envelop an indistinct figure in Universal Everything’s new animation. “Transfiguration” follows a central character as it wades across the screen wearing full-coverage suits that evolve with each step. Despite the mesmerizing changes in appearance, the figure never walks farther than mid-frame.
To create this new, CGI animation, Universal Everything (previously) updated a similar piece from 2011. More Continue reading

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